Update!

[ Cover art by: xaiyasak ]

It’s been a little while since I last did a proper blog post. Rest assured I’ve been writing each and every day. That’s the strange thing with writing. The finished product is literally the tip of the iceberg, floating on the back of years of effort and struggle.

So what’s breaking the surface next for me? Well, I’ve started writing outlines for Death Echo: Vol. 3.

DEv3 will be the final instalment in what has been a massively interesting and educational experience. I’ve made mistakes, and I know now that I am many things, but I am not an editor. How they manage their magic I’ll never know! I’ve also received some wonderful reactions and it feels amazing to have my work out there, being read by real human eyes.

Death Echo: Vol. 3 won’t be out for a while, at least a year. I really want to take my time with it.

In other news my novel, Proper Magic (a comical but sincere fantasy) is nearing completion. I’m so excited about it! I’ll be looking to find an agent and get it traditionally published. As previously stated on this blog I don’t trust Amazon with a novel. Or rather – I don’t trust myself to do the long, hard sell that novels require when it comes to self-publishing.

In that regard I’m perhaps a little too insular. That’s something to work on I suppose.

I’ve found a really good life/writing/relaxing balance. I take my laptop into work now and spend around 40 minutes of my lunch break writing. Then when I come home I’m not on edge about needing to write and I’m able to enjoy time with my fiancé and fur babies. Then on the weekends I do some editing and a big chunk of writing, along with playing computer games (maintaining other hobbies is key to happiness y’all!).

In conclusion – All is good. I’m writing, a lot.

Now, if I could only shake this cold…

– Sebastyan

 


Death Echo: Vol. 1

Death Echo: Vol. 2

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When is your Story Ready?

‘When is it ready?’ is the ultimate question for anyone trying to create something, be it a song, a painting, a sculpture made entirely of bread-sticks, or even a story.

The answer to this is: never. That’s right. Nothing is every finished, but it can be ‘good enough’. Everything you’ve ever absorbed through whatever media has been pushed out because it’s ‘good enough’, not because it’s done in the eyes of the creator.

That sounds really cynical – but let me explain. There are countless writers out there writing and rewriting stories that will never see the light of day. Editing is vital, obviously, but I have to wonder whether in these cases the writer simply doesn’t want to let go of their creation. It’s like being an over protective parent – you have to let your baby grow up and go out into the world. That child has to make mistakes in order to become better –  a story has to be exposed to the eyes of strangers in order for the author to learn from it.

Why am I talking about this? Because Death Echo: Vol.1 was an exercise in getting something out there. It was also an exercise in editing, which was helped by the relatively low word count of each story. I couldn’t have gotten through it without all the people who came forward to test-read my work.

Vol.2 is a different beast. Having listened to feedback I wanted to make the stories longer – not massively so, just a little meatier. This has slowed the process down, and getting beta-readers will be vital in order to create the story collection I envision.

The worst thing I could do is release a volume with shoddy stories. I mustn’t let my eagerness result in a bad product, but I also don’t want to sit on my hands and delay!

Essentially when we create something we have three options –

  • Keep working on it endlessly and never show another living soul (it’s important knowing when to let go!)
  • Release it too soon and risk a bad response (All confidence and no restraint is generally a bad move – patience is key.)
  • Work on it to the best of your ability and then have the courage to share it (This one. Do this one.)

It’s a balancing act between all three even at the best of times. I can honestly say that sharing my work has helped a huge amount. To share something is to show courage. To improve upon something is wise. To love the (sometimes painful) process is liberating.

Your story may never be ready – but you can be.

– Sebastyan

 

Where did Death Echo come from?

My grandfather died Christmas 2016. Death had seemed a long way away – suddenly it was at the door. The bubble had popped and everything felt suddenly very small and very delicate.

Mortality had arrived.

One of my short stories had been published but I felt as though I was standing still. On January the 1st I swore to put something out there. Time was short and I had to DO something.

Telling people I was a writer felt like a lie. I needed a product.

Reading through the short stories I’d written over the years something struck me – they were all about death. Not always directly, but they were all touched by the idea of endings, of passing.

This gave my theme: death.

March 2017 saw the release of Death Echo: Vol. 1, a collection of short stories by myself, illustrated by Jade Andrews.

Death Echo is a personal project. I never intended to make money from it (I still don’t) but I knew I wanted full control, something self-publishing facilitates. Three months of nonstop writing and editing, and some beautiful art and I had a product.

It went on sale at the end of March, though it nearly ended up in April due to my own struggles with Amazon’s upload system. The reaction was far better than I expected – I don’t have much of footprint when it comes to social media. Despite that I had over a hundred units moved in a week and a half (downloads and physical copies). I’ve not looked since, this isn’t a number game at the moment.

It was encouraging. Now I had something to talk about, something to sell. It was something I’d written and shaped and sent out there. I had friends, family and strangers all reading a reviewing my work. For the first time since declaring myself a writer I actually FELT like a writer.

It came from a place of desperation and fear but became something rather different. It may be about death but I hope in execution it’s something more uplifting.

– Sebastyan

Radio Silence = Busy Writer

I’m a firm believer that the quieter a writer is the more they’re writing. This has certainly been the case with me. These last few months I’ve buried myself in my work in order to reach a pretty extreme deadline. The thought of missing it fills me with dread, but I mustn’t let my desire for progress get in the way of the quality of the final product. All told I have around a month to get things in order.

I’ll make more announcements closer to the deadline, as I’ll have a better idea of what’s happening. In the meantime rest assured that every free moment I have is spent agonizing over the hobby that I so dearly wish to make a career.

– Sebastyan

Emotional Support and Writing

Everyone needs emotional support from time to time. We’re human, no-one is an island. And even if you ARE an island you’d probably still enjoy company.

It’s something I’ve taken for granted for quite a while: having someone close who supports your creative pursuits makes such a massive difference. My partner has always been supportive, whether its reading my stories for me, making me tea whilst I write, or just having blind faith that it’ll all lead somewhere.

I can’t stress enough how much blind faith is needed when it comes to creative things.

I guess what I’m saying is – if you have someone who supports you then make sure they know you appreciate them.

And if you don’t have someone like that don’t despair! If you have that creativity within you then it’ll find its way out. It better to be alone but believe in yourself than it is to be with someone who puts you down/gets between you and your dream.

– Sebastyan

Discworld

To those of you who don’t know:

Discworld is a comic fantasy book series written by the English author Terry Pratchett, set on the fictional Discworld, a flat disc balanced on the backs of four elephants which in turn stand on the back of a giant turtle, Great A’Tuin.

Isn’t it perfect? How many fantasy books are out there with their own worlds? How many weird, made up names have authors created? Yet none are so memorable as the Discworld. None match its creative simplicity. Why is this? I think there are three reasons:

  • The absurdity of it – (see above description)
  • It plays on the silly idea of a flat earth – (Any flat earthers in the house??)

and perhaps most crucially:

  • The word makes sense!

This last one I find the most interesting. Go up to someone and say ‘Discworld’. They may well tell you to fuck off, but at the same time they’ll get an image in their head, perhaps not of the turtle and the elephants, but of a disc shaped world. It marries two words that people understand: ‘disc’ and ‘world’ and builds something amazing around it.

How can a writer match that?

In my current novel: ‘Proper Magic’, I have a fantasy world. I have a concept that I hope will set it apart from its peers, but it still needs a name and I can guarantee it’ll be no Discworld…

Ah well, aim for the stars. Who knows: you may hit an elephant.

– Sebastyan

Write More than One Thing at a Time

Perhaps you’ve read that title and gone:

‘Well, duh! I’m writing a hundred things!’

or

‘But all my effort is going into this one project!’

Neither response is wrong and we all have our own systems, but if your answer was the latter then might I suggest having two projects on the go?

Back when I focused on one thing at a time I got mired in the effort. This is partly due to forcing my storytelling into one particular type of story, even when my mood was elsewhere because ‘I have to focus on this to get it done.’

I don’t suggest writing loads at once. Having a dozen novels on the go leads nowhere and you end up drowning. But have two stories, or like in my case I have the Death Echo series in the background while working on my novel, Proper Magic.

It helps clear out the creative cobwebs which turn up after too long spent cleaning the living-room but ignoring the attic!

When you hit a block in one project dive into the other. The less wasted time the better, and the more you’ll learn about your writing.

– Sebastyan